Tony Clickbait Ortega

Look back over the regrettable career of Tony Ortega and you will find it is littered with trashy, fabricated stories aimed chiefly toward uneducated readers of free alt weekly newspapers and online gossip blogs.

Tony Ortega’s inventions have ranged from fake stories about fake people, to wackadoo claims designed to smear and defame. It’s all in a day’s work for Tony Ortega and his #PayAttentionToME journalism.

As an amateur blogger, Tony Ortega never really had a talent for writing articles himself. Even during the years he found himself in gainful employ (long since gone now), working for the New Times rugs or Raw Story he rarely did the writing himself. He much preferred to put a subordinate on the job, and let him take the bulk of the blowback when the facts surrounding his pieces inevitably exposed his contrivances. For, as we’ve seen, there is no bar low enough that Tony Ortega won’t find some way to slither beneath it to try and gin up clicks on the web, consequences be damned.

In many ways, it was Ortega’s specialization in this kind of garbage tabloid “journalism” that prepared him for the role he would play at the Village Voice. There he could lie, invent, and push wild, unfounded claims with impunity as he gleefully defended his employers’ online child sex trafficking website Backpage.com.

Indeed, it was Tony Ortega who concluded that the Backpage model of selling children for sex with strangers using local hotels really couldn’t be that bad, after all, in Ortega’s words: “…the kids don’t have to hang out on the streets or in back alleys.”

His usefulness to the fat cat pimp enablers running the sordid operation at the Village Voice, however, would come to an end. As soon as the Backpage bosses got winds of the feds’ investigation they quickly let Ortega go but not before buying his “loyalty” with a substantial severance package.

Tony Ortega was not about to let his finely tuned propaganda skills go to waste but with his cushy job as a spokesman for online prostitution now in his rearview, he understood he had to find something new to showcase his “talents”.

What he found was the Raw Story.

That’s where he discovered the art of using clickbait headlines about non-stories to drive traffic. The more outlandish and offensive the headline, the better. Naturally, Tony was soon fired from that job too, but the lessons he learned seemed to have stuck with him.

These days lies, clickbait, and offensiveness are really all he has left.

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